Shaaz Nasir

Archive for the ‘Packing’ Category

Doubt Me.

In Advice, Blog, Business, Canada, China, City Council, Culture, Economics, Economics Association, ESA, Exercise, Experience, Failure, Faith, Film, Football, Glasses, Globalization, google, GQ Magazine, Greeting, Life, Metrosexual, Orientation, Packing, Tennis, Traveling, Uncategorized, University of Ottawa, World on October 27, 2010 at 12:07 am

Doubt if you must, it’s something I have grown accustom to. If people don’t doubt you it means you’re not pushing the boundaries, not daring to do something that can’t be done. The moment people stop doubting you it’s not because you won them over but rather because you lost yourself.”

– life experiences

From the start people will doubt you and your aspirations. In an attempt to clip your wings all types of methods will be used; no matter what you must resist the barraged of attacks. At the end of high-school after 4 years of planning to become a psychologist I discovered the world of economics. My plan for the next 10 years was scratched in 10 minutes as I frantically scrambled through my research to determine the prerequisites of my new dream.

The Chinese could not have built a greater wall than what stood between me and economics.

The hurdles added up to around 2 years of more schooling. I scurried over to my high school academic advisor to devise a master plan in which my dream would become a reality way sooner. Little did I know, she would doubt me.

“Shaaz, why are you trying? Just give up on this goal of yours. You can’t do this it’s just too much for you. Stop and settle for what you have; you would probably need 3 years of schooling to get the perquisites. There is no way this can be done.”

Some great Academic Advice eh?

So I picked up the pieces of my shattered goal from the floor and made a quick exit. After some consulting with my family and other sources (you can smell my sheer determination at this point, never give up), the solution was found!

Take that Risk

I had a meeting with the department of economics at Carleton which produced a a risky choice. I could take a harder version of  grade 12 calculus at Carleton (some hybrid version which means more in-depth/challenging) and VOILA  I would be majoring in economics at uOttawa. However, the chance to waste money, time, rejecting job offers and failing was high as I had ZERO experience with math at that level.

Of course I took the class.

LONG days LONG nights and NO Summer with LOTS of stress. On average 5-6 hours of studying a day everyday period.

Raw brute force.

Result?

Determination worked as I finished in the top 10% percent of the class with a 79%.  Proved a good amount of people wrong but more importantly proved to myself I could live out my dream, no matter how tall those walls were.

Now I am only 7 months away from my degree in International Economics and Development with a minor in Business Administration. I have 3 years of government work experience. I have the privilege to be the VP Finance of uOttawa’s Tennis League and  the VP Academic uOttawa’s Economic Student Association. Furthermore, I been lucky enough to embark on a 20 day economic delegation to China and Malaysia as a Trade Ambassador.

This message  is not about me or my life but rather about the powers of doubt itself.

Keep pushing the boundaries and doing what’s not possible time and time again.

So for those people please continue to doubt me and MTG.

It only means good things are coming our way…

Advertisements

Mind the Economy: “Currency War” made simple

In Advice, Beijing, Blog, Business, Canada, China, Economics, Global Vision, Globalization, Guangzhou, Hong Kong, India, Kuala Lampur, Life, Lunch, Malaysia, Ottawa, Packing, Shenzhen, SME, Song, Success, Technology, Television, Traveling, Uncategorized, University of Ottawa, World on October 17, 2010 at 12:36 pm

How do Currencies and Interest rates play off each other?

More recently, many developing countries have had to contend with their own currencies rising and undermining their competitiveness.

The problem is that those low interest rates in the developed world have led investors to seek higher returns elsewhere, in emerging markets.

To invest in those markets, they need to buy the currency and that pushes its value up. That in turn makes those countries’ goods more expensive for foreign buyers and the overseas investment money creates a danger of unsustainable bubbles in their property and financial markets.

China has stopped its currency rising much by buying foreign currency. If it were to refrain from that and allow the yuan to rise, it would probably help other developing countries that compete with China, as well as the US which is protesting the most.

But there is another force behind the rising developing world currencies. Their economies are growing robustly, while the rich countries are not.

The tension over between the US and China over currency policy surfaced once again at the International Monetary Fund Talks

USA renewed the pressure on China to allow its currency to rise. The US has a long-standing grievance over China’s currency policy, which limits the movement of the yuan against the dollar. The American complaint is that it gives Chinese exporters an unfair competitive advantage.

There was a vigorous response from Zhou Xiaochuan, governor of China’s central bank (The People’s Bank of China), who blamed the rich countries for problems in the currency markets. Mr Zhou said extremely low interest rates in rich countries had created “stark challenges for emerging market countries”.

My Thoughts on the Gap.

Tensions are rising among the developing world and developed as priorities on currency (non)manipulation begin to clash. However, should a country stop manipulating its currency in the name of “fairness”?

Destabilizing the economy in the short run, running the risk of damaging the private sector as businesses go bankrupt; jeopardizing an economy’s growth and ability to reduce poverty  does not sound “fair”. The notion of “fair” implies morals which begs the question: who is making these moral rules?

WTO….IMF….WB……USA…..CHINA…..WALDO?????

International Economics is a game where rules are subjective but actual substantive growth is tangibly objective. I am not for currency manipulation but neither am I for irrational and sudden policies  that would jeopardize  an entire economy….especially not the economy that’s the driving force of world growth in terms of consumer consumption ….

-Articles combined from BBC & CBC

Crazy Chinese Video by Shaaz and Potters in Guangzhou

In Canada, China, Food, Friends, Global Vision, Globalization, Guangzhou, Life, Packing, Success, Technology, Traveling, World, Youtube on August 20, 2010 at 8:40 pm

As we entered our world class hotel, Mr. Potters was transfixed on the floating musical instrument….it was a white piano on some type of platform which floated on water (leave it to the Chinese to make something this epic).  Mr. Potters was tired from the long bus ride  and stated “this is some fine looking glass” as he jumped into the water (about 1 foot deep). He shortly realizes glass is not liquid as he scurries over to counter asking whether it was possible to dry his very nice shoes……

The man replies “Ah yes we will send them to the shoe cleaning centre”

we both replied “A SHOE CLEANING CENTRE?!?!!?”

about 30 mins later after we settle down in our amazing room, we decide to make a video ……..upon recording the Shoe Cleaning Centre enters the room by fluke….

The rest is history, enjoy the video of two very tired individuals being exposed to a world class hotel room.

please remember…we were running on 6 hours of sleep over 2 days…lol we were flipping out for no reason..also there was not a shanty town it was a construction zone…..it will all make sense once you watch the video.

I love Guangzhou. Good Memories.

Chinese Robin Hood!

In Beijing, Canada, China, Economics, Experience, Global Vision, Globalization, Greeting, Guangzhou, Hong Kong, Kuala Lampur, Malaysia, Meeting, Packing, Shenzhen, Suit, University of Ottawa, Work, World on July 24, 2010 at 8:43 pm

Annie Wu established the first joint-venture company in mainland China.  In 1979, after Deng Xiaoping introduced his policy of reform and opening to the world, Annie Wu was the first entrepreneur through the open door. She beat the competition for the now-legendary No. 001 Joint Venture business license. Her company provides on-flight catering for Air China.

The Hong Kong businesswoman is the proud owner of business license 001, for Beijing Air Catering Company. Wu is chairperson of the World Trade Centers Association of Hong Kong, and her devotion to public service has been recognized through a string of awards.

Her upbringing had a big impact on her life. “My family was very progressive. People were always coming to the house to meet my father, and so I got to meet a wide range of people. We were not an average Chinese family. It was an innovative and encouraging environment,” Wu said. From her father, Wu learned “the business world is a world for men.” That, however, didn’t deter her.
Wu had a head start in life: She attended Sacred Heart Canossian College in Hong Kong, and St Godric’s College, a finishing school in Hampstead Heath in London.

How does she do it? “Anything is possible if you have good staff around you. I believe you can groom yourself into the style of life you want,” she says. “I wanted to be Robin Hood. He’s a hero of robbing the rich to help the poor.” It could be said that Wu has achieved her dream; while her business ventures have always stayed above board, she has focused her time and attention on convincing Hong Kong’s wealthy to donate money to the most needy in society.

She’s a modern-day Chinese Robin Hood.
 She has focused much of her charity efforts on children. Her work at the Chinese History and Culture Educational Foundation for Youth is aimed at educating Hong Kong’s young people about their cultural identity. “Hong Kong has no national identity. We want young Chinese to have a Chinese identity. Not only be patriotic, but to have a link with the mainland,” says Wu.

The organization arranges five-day visits to Beijing for Hong Kong children who would not normally have such an opportunity. “They get to know Chinese history and culture instantly.” What is her advice to children who dream of success? “Be assertive, flexible and congenial. Don’t sit around waiting to be served. Have ambition and develop your own goals.”

There are lots of people all over China who depend on Wu. The Chinese Government launched its Western Development Strategy in 1999, and Wu rose to the challenge.

Her footsteps are all over Yunnan Province and the Tibet and Ningxia Hui autonomous regions. With The United Nations Children’s Fund—UNICEF (China), she lobbied for funding from the Ministry of Health for a national hepatitis B vaccination program for children. Ningxia became the testing site for the project. Wu is a council member of UNICEF Hong Kong who has donated more than US $17.5 million to UNICEF (China). “This was not from corporate donors, but from people on the street. We organized pop concerts, video appeals and street stands,” she said.
 Wu has many roles: Successful entrepreneur, China’s Robin Hood, and fairy godmother to the children around her. So, when does she make time for herself? She doesn’t. Says Wu, “If you look at what you can do for yourself, you’ll become very small minded.”

for the full article

http://www.womenofchina.cn/Profiles/Businesswomen/15568.jsp

Watch out for Shenzhen!

In Business, Canada, China, Economics, Experience, Future, Global Vision, Globalization, Greeting, Meeting, Packing, Shenzhen, Traveling, University of Ottawa, Work, World on July 24, 2010 at 6:01 pm

One of the cities we will be traveling to …

China’s economic liberalization under the policies of reformist leader Deng Xiaoping, the area became China’s first—and arguably one of the most successful—Special Economic Zones.

Shenzhen’s modern cityscape is the result of the vibrant economy made possible by rapid foreign investment since the late 1970s, when it was a small fishing village. Since then, foreign nationals have invested more than US $30 billion for building factories and forming joint ventures.

It is now reputedly one of the fastest growing cities in the world. Being southern mainland China’s major financial centre, Shenzhen is home to the Shenzhen Stock Exchange as well as the headquarters of numerous high-tech companies.

Mind the Culture: Indian Poem/Song

In Advice, Canada, China, Experience, Film, Friends, Global Vision, Globalization, Greeting, Hindi, Meeting, Packing, Song, World, Youtube on July 21, 2010 at 2:23 pm

I stumbled upon a very meaningful song the other day. Now as many of my friends know, I have a good grasp on Hindi and Urdu so I will do my best to bring some sense/context into the translation.

Click the title of the this post to see the entire screen.

Hindi Lyrics:

Aankhon Mein Jis Ke Koi To Khwaaab Hai
Khush Tha Wahin Jo Thoda Betaaab Hai
Zindagi Mein Koi Arzooo Kijiye
Phir Dekhiye ……

Hoton Pe Jis Ke Koi To Geeet Hai
Woh Haare Bhi To Us Ki Hi Jeeet Hai
Dil Mein Jo.. Geet Hai Gun Guna.. Lijiye
Phir Dekhiye……

Yaadon Mein Jis Ke Kisi Ka Naaam Hai
Sapno Ke Jaise Us Ki Har Shaaam Hai
Koi To.. Aaj Se Apna Dil.. Dijiye
Phir Dekhiye…

Khwab Bhun.. Yeh Zara Geet Sun.. Yeh Zara
Phool Chun.. Yeh Zara…
Phir Dekhiye…

Raw English translation

In whose eyes there is some dream
The only happy one is the one who is restless
Hope for something in life
Then see

On whose lips there is a song
Within that defeat lies his victory
Hum the song that is in your heart
Then see

In whose memories their lies someone’s name,
Whose every evening is like a dream
Then see

Weave this dream
Listen to this song
Pick this flower,
Then see

Shaaz’s context translation

Translating the context is very hard for anyone. Hindi is a simple yet complex language; a great example is:

Phir Dekhiye  or “then see”

“Then see” can be translated to”‘we will revisit the situation at another time” or “after acting, you will see the implications”.  I can go on forever but English likes to over complicate things. When I read “Phir Dekhiye”, I understand the meaning (which can be up to 100 words in English).

Now for the overall message of the song,

Stay the course, go out and get what you want, control that desire you have, you will find lessons in your losses, move forward.

Now with this in mind listen to the song again while reading the raw english translation, then see.

Pack it all up

In Advice, Beijing, China, Packing, Suit, Traveling on July 19, 2010 at 7:15 pm

With only 13 days left until we leave for Beijing things are getting crazy….

I have my visa, shots, passport renewed and health insurance, and now I have to squeeze 20 days of cloths into one suitcase!

Only the basics will survive my ruthless selection processes, so obviously black, grey, and navy blue suits. A ton of white dress shirts to coincide with an equal amount ties; dress shoes are also a must. It’s time to restructure my “ruthless selection process”…

Please lend a helping hand and leave some advice in the comments section!